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Five University of the West of Scotland (UWS) students have been awarded a coveted scholarship to enable them to develop their independent research skills over the summer break.

The Carnegie Vacation Scholarship is awarded to students from qualifying higher education institutions who wish to undertake a programme of independent research during the holiday period which will be of direct benefit to their studies.

Each project can last between two and 12 weeks, with students being paid the Scottish Living Wage.

The five UWS students – Amy Lessels from the University’s School of Health and Life Sciences, and Eszter Révéz, Jack McKinlay, Jane Franchi and Sarah Wale Soto, all from the School of Education and Social Sciences – are all moving into their Honours year at the University.

Fascinating projects

The undergraduate students have been using their break to work on a variety of fascinating projects, from exploring the relationship between acquired head injury and criminal behaviour to investigating parents’ attitudes towards inclusion of young people with autism spectrum disorder in schools.

This year, the Scholarship – which is provided by the Carnegie Trust – was awarded to 75 individuals across Scotland, with 175 applications made.

Professor Milan Radosavljevic, Vice-Principal of Research, Innovation and Engagement at UWS, said: “At UWS, we believe in excellent, relevant and purposeful research, and the Carnegie Trust’s Vacation Scholarship gives our undergraduate students the opportunity to develop the skills which are central to this."

“We encourage our students at all levels to explore the topics which interest them, and I am thrilled to see the variety of subjects which this year’s Carnegie Scholars have chosen to investigate. I look forward to seeing their final projects – and I am confident that this is just the beginning for the next generation of UWS researchers.”
Professor Milan Radosavljevic, Vice-Principal of Research, Innovation and Engagement
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